Book of the dead website

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Negroes in that city had begun a boycott of buses to win the right to sit where they pleased instead of being forced to move to the rear of buses, in Southern tradition or to surrender seats to white people when a bus was crowded.

The day boycott by Negroes was already under way when the young pastor was placed in charge of the campaign. It has been said that one of the reasons he got the job was because he was so new in the area he had not antagonized any of the Negro factions.

Even while the boycott was under way, a board of directors handled the bulk of administrative work.

However, it was Dr. King who dramatized the boycott with his decision to make it the testing ground, before the eyes of the nation, of his belief in the civil disobedience teachings of Thoreau and Gandhi.

When he was arrested during the Montgomery boycott, he said:. We must use the weapon of love. We must have compassion and understanding for those who hate us.

We must realize so many people are taught to hate us that they are not totally responsible for their hate. But we stand in life at midnight; we are always on the threshold of a new dawn.

Even more dramatic, in some ways, was his reaction to the bombing of his home during the boycott. He was away at the time and rushed back fearful for his wife and children.

They were not injured. But when he reached the modest house, more than a thousand Negroes had already gathered and were in an ugly mood, seeking revenge against the white people.

The police were jittery. King pacified the crowd and there was no trouble. King was even more impressive during the "big push" in Birmingham, which began in April, With the minister at the limelight, Negroes there began a campaign of sit-ins at lunch counters, picketing and protest marches.

Hundreds of children, used in the campaign, were jailed. The entire world was stirred when the police turned dogs on the demonstrators.

King was jailed for five days. While he was in prison he issued a 9,word letter that created considerable controversy among white people, alienating some sympathizers who thought Dr.

King was being too aggressive. Some critics of Dr. King said that one reason for this letter was to answer Negro intellectuals, such as the wrier James Baldwin, who were impatient with Dr.

King's belief in brotherhood. Whatever the reasons, the role of Dr. King in Birmingham added to his stature and showed that his enormous following was deeply devoted to him.

He demonstrated this in a threatening situation in Albany, Ga. King said at the funeral:. We must not lose faith in our white brothers.

King's words grew more potent and he was invited to the White House by President Kennedy and Johnson, some critics--Negroes as well as white--noted that sometimes, despite all the publicity he attracted, he left campaigns unfinished or else failed to attain his goals.

King was aware of this. But he pointed out, in , in St Augustine, Fla. It tends to generate courage in Negroes outside the movement.

It brings intangible results outside the community where it is carried out. There is a hardening of attitudes in situations like this.

But other cities see and say: Some communities, like this one, had to bear the cross. There was no false modesty in Dr. King's self appraisal of his role in the civil rights movement.

It would be both immoral and a sign of ingratitude if I did not face my moral responsibility to do what I can in this struggle. We will meet your physical force with soul force.

We will not hate you, but we cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws. We will soon were you down by our capacity to suffer. And in winning our freedom we will so appeal to your heart and conscience that we will win you in the process.

The enormous influence of Dr. King's voice in the turbulent racial conflict reached into New York in In the summer of that year racial rioting exploded in New York and in other Northern cities with large Negro populations.

There was widespread fear that the disorders, particularly in Harlem, might set of unprecedented racial violence. At this point Dr. King became one of the major intermediaries in restoring order.

He conferred with Mayor Robert F. Wagner and with Negro leaders. A statement was issued, of which he was one of the signers, calling for "a broad curtailment if not total moratorium on mass demonstrations until after Presidential elections.

The following year, Dr. King was once more in the headlines and on television--this time leading a drive for Negro voter registration in Selma, Ala.

Negroes were arrested by the hundreds. King was punched and kicked by a white man when, during this period of protest, he became the first Negro to register at a century-old hotel in Selma.

As a child his name was Michael Luther King and so was his father's. His father changed both their names legally to Martin Luther King in honor of the Protestant reformer.

Auburn Avenue is one of the nation's most widely known Negro sections. Many successful Negro business or professional men have lived there.

Martin Luther King Sr. Young Martin went to Atlanta's Morehouse College, a Negro institution whose students acquired what was sometimes called the "Morehouse swank.

Mays, took a special interest in Martin, who had decided, in his junior year, to be a clergyman. He was ordained a minister in his father's church in It was in this church he was to say, some years later:.

You've trampled over 19 million of your brethren. All men are created equal. America, rise up and come home. King had his own church he pursued his studies in the integrated Crozier Theological Seminary, in Chester, Pa.

He was one of six Negroes in a student body of about a hundred. He became the first Negro class president.

He was named the outstanding student and won a fellowship to study for a doctorate at the school of his choice. The young man enrolled at Boston College in For his doctoral thesis he sought to resolve the differences between the Harvard theologian Paul Tillich and the neo-naturalist philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman.

During this period he took courses at Harvard, as well. While he was working on his doctorate he met Coretta Scott, a graduate of Antioch College, who was doing graduate work in music.

He married the singer in At that time few of Montgomery's white residents saw any reason for a major dispute with the city's 50, Negroes.

They did not seem to realize how deeply the Negroes resented segregated seating on buses, for instance.

Rosa Parks, a Negro seamstress, refused to comply with a bus driver's order to give up her seat to a white passenger.

She was tired, she said. Her feet hurt from a day of shopping. Almost as spontaneous as Mrs. Parks's act was the rallying of many Negro leaders in the city to help her.

King and his family moved back to Atlanta, where he became a co-pastor, with his father, of the Ebenezer Baptist Church. As his fame increased, public interest in his beliefs led him to write books.

It was while he was autographing one of these books, "Stride Toward Freedom," in a Harlem department store that he was stabbed by a Negro woman.

It was in these books that he summarized, in detail, his beliefs as well as his career. Thus, in "Why We Can't Wait," he wrote:.

He has not organized for conquest or to gain spoils or to enslave those who have injured him. His goal is not to capture that which belongs to someone else.

He merely wants, and will have, what is honorably his. The possibility that he might someday be assassinated was considered by Dr. King on June 5, , when he reported, in St.

Death was due to peritonitis, which followed the first operation, that for appendicitis. The second operation was performed last Friday.

Like a newly discovered serum, used for the first time in Houdini's case, it was of no avail. The chapter of accidents which ended fatally for the man who so often had seemed to thousands to be cheating the very jaws of death began early in October at Albany, N.

On the opening night of his engagement at a theatre there a piece of apparatus used in his "water torture cell" trick was overturned and struck him on the foot.

Houdini called a physician from the audience, had his foot examined and then completed his performance. Afterward he went to a hospital and had the injured foot X-rayed.

A bone was found to be partly fractured and Houdini was advised to discontinue his tour a few days and give prompt attention and plenty of rest to the injured foot.

He declined to cancel his engagements, however, and did not miss a show. From Albany he and his company went to Schenectady.

Houdini was suffering continuous pain and returned to Albany for several treatments. By the time he left Schenectady for Montreal his whole system was in a weakened condition.

During a reception following the address he commented on the strength of his stomach muscles and their ability to withstand hard blows without injury.

One of the students without warning or giving time for Houdini to prepare struck him twice immediately over his appendix.

He suffered no distress at the time but after he had boarded a train for Detroit he complained of pain. At first he attributed it to something he had eaten but as it increased he called in the company's nurse, who in turn arranged by wire to have a physician meet the magician in Detroit.

Leo Kretzka, a prominent physician, made a hurried examination and told the patient there were symptoms of appendicitis. He left it to Houdini to decide whether it would be advisable for him to appear that evening at the Garrick Theatre for the opening night of the show.

Houdini would not disappoint his admirers. Looking back on that last performance, the large audience now realizes that the famous magician did his tricks under a great strain.

He felt the grip of bonds he had never tested, the snap of a lock not forged by human hands. He was worried for one of the few times in his career and was plainly not up to his best form in some of his tricks.

At his hotel after the performance the pain increased. The house physician and the best Detroit could furnish were called.

Houdini was taken to Gray Hospital and the following afternoon underwent an operation for appendicitis. His removal from the hotel to the hospital was made at the suggestion of his family physician, William Stone of New York City, who had been notified by telephone of his friend's condition.

Until his death Houdini was conscious and his mind was keen and alert. The physicians who attended him say he was the best patient they ever had, and he helped them wonderfully.

His mental attitude, combined with his unusual stamina, did much to prolong his life. According to statements made by the physicians, the playful punches he received in Montreal were the direct cause of Houdini's death, for one of the blows caused the appendix to burst, saturating his system with poison.

Streptococcus peritonitis, which developed soon after the operation last Monday, seriously complicated the case.

This is a particularly virulent form of poisoning, and few cases are known to the medical profession where persons suffering from it have recovered. Whatever the methods by which Harry Houdini deceived a large part of the world for nearly four decades, his career stamped him as one of the greatest showmen of modern times.

In his special field of entertainment he stood alone. With a few minor exceptions, he invented all his tricks and illusions, and in certain instances only his four intimate helpers knew the solution.

In one or two very important cases Houdini, himself, alone knew the whole secret. Houdini was born on March 24, His name originally was Eric Weiss and he was the son of a rabbi.

He did not take the name Harry Houdini until he had been a performer for many years. Legend has it that he opened his first lock when he wanted a piece of pie in the kitchen closet.

It is certain that when scarcely more than a baby he showed skill as an acrobat and contortionist, and both these talents helped his start in the show business and his later development as an "escape king.

At the age of 9 Houdini joined a traveling circus, touring Wisconsin as a contortionist and trapeze performer. The Davenport brothers were then famous, doing the first spiritualist work ever seen in this country.

They would ring bells while bound inside a cabinet and would agree to free themselves from any bonds. This inspired Houdini to a somewhat similar performance.

Standing in the middle of the ring, he would invite any one to tie him with ropes and would then free himself inside the cabinet.

In the ring at Coffeyville, Kan. Houdini, still only a boy, told him to go ahead. After a much longer stay in the cabinet than usual, the performer emerged, carrying the handcuffs in his free hands.

That was the beginning of his long series of escapes from every known sort of manacle. For years he called himself the Handcuff King, a title discarded as he extended and elevated the range of his performances.

From to he played all over the United States, in museums, music halls, circuses, and medicine shows, gradually improving his technique and giving up his purely contortionistic and acrobatic feats.

In he made his first visit abroad, and in London his sensational escapes from handcuffs at Scotland Yard won him a six months engagement at the Alhambra.

This was the first instance of his cleverly obtaining notoriety by a public or semi-public exhibition outside the theatre. No other showman, unless it was Barnum, knew better how to arouse the curiosity and amazement of the public in this manner.

During a six-year tour of the Continent he escaped from dozens of famous prisons. In the Krupp plant at Essen he met the challenge of the workmen and freed himself from expertly constructed shackles before 70, persons.

He returned to America to find his fame greatly increased and a newly organized vaudeville ready to pay him many times his old salary.

He continued his prison escapes over here and in January, , broke from Cell 2 in the Federal prison at Washington, the cell in which Guiteau, President Garfield's assassin, had been confined.

In Houdini dropped the handcuff tricks for more dangerous and dramatic escapes, including one from an air-tight galvanized vessel, filled with water, locked in an iron- bound chest.

And he would free himself from the so-called torture cell, his own invention. In this he was suspended, head down, in a tank of water.

To thrill the general public he would hang from the roof of a skyscraper, bound in a strait-jacket, from which he would wriggle free to the applause of the crowd in the street below.

Thrown from a boat or bridge into a river, bound hand and foot and locked and nailed in a box, doomed to certain death by drowning or suffocation, he would emerge in a minute or so, a free man, swimming vigorously to safety.

In the last twenty years Houdini made many long tours, playing in nearly every important city in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.

Occasionally others would attempt to imitate him, but his supremacy never was remotely threatened. An evidence of the deep impression his work made on the public mind is the fact that the Standard Dictionary now contains a verb, "houdinize," meaning "to release or extricate oneself from confinement, bonds, or the like , as by wriggling out.

During the last few years Houdini had become internationally known as a tireless enemy and exposer of fraudulent mediums and all false claims in the field of spiritualism.

He was a member of The Scientific American committee that investigated Margery, the Boston medium, whom he denounced in vigorous language.

Most of it has been willed to the National Museum at Washington. He married in Wilhelmina Rahner of Brooklyn. He was a member of St.

Few men could relate more interesting anecdotes and experiences than Harry Houdini. He was fond of telling how he beguiled the late Theodore Roosevelt and the late Victor Herbert on a voyage to Europe aboard the Imperator.

Colonel Roosevelt had just returned from his exploration of the River of Doubt in Brazil. A number of other well-known men were present, all of them having intelligence of a high order.

Certainly it was not a credulous audience. I offered to summon the spirits and have them answer any questions that might be asked. I had a slate with the usual covering and in a few moments brought forth a map, done in a dozen different colors of chalk, which indicated the spot where he had been on the famous River of Doubt.

That map was an exact duplicate of one that was to appear in his book which had not been published. I had never seen the map and, to make my case stronger, the name of W.

Stead, the English spiritualist and writer who lost his life on the Titanic, was signed below the map in a handwriting which one man present instantly recognized as that of Stead.

And I might add that I was unfamiliar with Stead's signature. The magician tried his hand at the medium business in his early days in Kansas and used to tell in this wise how he prepared for one of his first seances:.

When the time arrived for my act I puzzled the crowd by giving particulars of births and deaths in half of the families of the town.

Gradually I worked up to a climax, exclaiming:. What is this coming before me? Why, it is a man--a black man. He's lame--and his throat is cut from ear to ear.

Who is this man? For thirty-three years Houdini tried to solve the mysteries of spiritism. He told friends he was ready to believe, was anxious to believe, because he would find joy in proof that he could communicate with his father, mother and friends who had passed on.

He had agreed with friends and acquaintances, numbering hundreds, that the first to die was to try to communicate from the spirit world to the world of reality.

Fourteen of those friends had died, but none had ever given a sign, he said. Sargent, one of those who exposed Palladino in this city.

Our relations were most intimate. He died and I have not heard from him. Such an agreement I made with both my parents.

They died and I have not heard from them. I thought once I saw my mother in a vision, but I now believe it was imagination. We had worked together on the stage and had a private telegraphic code for signaling messages.

We made a compact that the first who died should use that code to communicate with the other. At his deathbed I held Berol's hand. He had been unconscious for some time.

He showed no outward signs of a return to consciousness. His eyes remained closed. But just as he passed away I could feel his hand making a faint pressure upon mine.

That was repeated at intervals and I could recognize that the man who seemed unconscious and at death's door was talking to me in code. I received and understood his message.

But I hold it sacred and have never repeated it. Houdini counted that he had had "four close-ups with death" in his career of more than thirty years as a mystifier.

The closest was in California, where he risked his life on a bet and not as a public performance. Seven years ago in Los Angeles he made a wager that he could free himself from a six-foot grave into which he was to be buried after being manacled.

He had first accustomed himself to the sensation of burial by more shallow interments. I had kept the sand loose about my body so that I could work dexterously.

But as I clawed and kneed the earth my strength began to fail. Then I made another mistake. Or, at least, I attempted to, and the last remnants of my self-possession left me.

Then instinct stepped in to the rescue. With my last reserve strength I fought through, more sand than air entering my nostrils.

The sunlight came like a blinding blessing, and my friends about the grave said that, chalky pale and wild-eyed as I was, I presented a perfect imitation of a dead man rising.

But Houdini did later permit himself to be "buried alive" in a hermetically sealed casket of zinc which was submerged in a pool at a New York hotel.

He remained there for more than an hour and a half, bettering the record of the Egyptian fakir, Rahmin Bey. When there was talk of a "return" submergence contest between the magician and the fakir, Houdini made preparations to defend his title with all the care that he was wont to exercise in working up his baffling feats.

He began to cancel engagements that conflicted with a period of training he mapped out for himself. Houdini went "down" or submerged in his sealed casket for half an hour daily.

Friends of the showman said yesterday that he had developed a dislike for being called by his first name, Harry. He always wished to be called Houdini and disliked the prefix, Mr.

According to dispatches from Nice Miss Duncan was hurled in an extraordinary manner from an open automobile in which she was riding and instantly killed by the force of her fall to the stone pavement.

Affecting, as was her habit, an unusual costume, Miss Duncan was wearing an immense iridescent silk scarf wrapped about her neck and streaming in long folds, part of which was swathed about her body with part trailing behind.

As she took her seat in the car neither she nor the driver noticed that one of the loose ends fell outside over the side of the car and was caught in the rear wheel of the machine.

The automobile was going at full speed when the scarf of strong silk suddenly began winding around the wheel and with terrific force dragged Miss Duncan, around whom it was securely wrapped, bodily over the side of the car, precipitating her with violence against the cobblestone street.

She was dragged for several yards before the chauffeur halted, attracted by her cries in the street. Medical aid immediately was summoned, but it was stated that she had been strangled and killed instantly.

This end to a life full of many pathetic episodes was received as a great shock in France, where, despite her numerous eccentric traits, Miss Duncan was regarded as a great artist.

The car in which they had been left seated started, driverless, down a hill and plunged over a bridge into the Seine River.

During the war she acquired the further gratitude of the French by turning over her palatial home here for war relief headquarters. She herself was reported to have made an attempt at suicide in the Mediterranean.

Miss Duncan, reduced in her resources recently, succeeded through the aid of friends in completing plans for a school of aesthetics which she meant to start on the Riviera.

It was recently a current rumor among the friends of Miss Duncan that she would find happiness in a marriage with an American, which was to be celebrated at Nice Oct.

In connection with her fatal accident it is recalled that Miss Duncan for years affected an unusual dress cult and, with her brother, Raymond, often appeared in the streets of Paris and elsewhere garbed in a Roman toga with bare legs and sandals.

Roman purple in recent years was her preferred color and she often walked about Nice in flowing scarfs and robes.

Alfred Hitchcock, whose mastery of suspense and of directing technique made him one of the most popular and celebrated of film makers, died yesterday at the age of 80 at his home in Los Angeles.

Hitchcock, ailing with arthritis and kidney failures, had been in declining health for a year. In a characteristically incisive remark, Mr.

Hitchcock once summed up his approach to moviemaking: His best movies were meticulously orchestrated nightmares of peril and pursuit relieved by unexpected comic ironies, absurdities and anomalies.

Films made by the portly, cherubic director invariably progressed from deceptively commonplace trifles of life to shattering revelations, and with elegant style and structure, he pervaded mundane events and scenes with a haunting mood of mounting anxiety.

In delicately balancing the commonplace and the bizarre, he was the most noted juggler of emotions in the longest major directorial career in film history.

His distinctive style was vigorously visual, always stressing imagery over dialogue and often using silence to increase apprehension.

Among his most stunning montages were a harrowing attack by a bullet-firing crop-dusting plane on Cary Grant at a deserted crossroad amid barren cornfields in "North by Northwest," a brutal shower-slaying in "Psycho" and an avian assault on a sleepy village in "The Birds.

Hitch, as he was called by his friends and colleagues, doubtlessly frightened more audiences than any other director in movie history, and he was one of the few film makers who was a household name for many decades.

A trademark was the fleeting, nonspeaking appearances he made in his films. As the leading British director of the 30's, he set the standard for international intrigue and espionage with such classic thrillers as "The 39 Steps" and "The Lady Vanishes.

Reflecting his motif of a world in disorder, Mr. Hitchcock placed endangered protagonists in settings epitomizing order--citadels of civilization, the Statue of Liberty, United Nations headquarters, Mount Rushmore and Britain's Parliament.

Reviewers acclaimed his virtuosity in creating a rhythm of anticipation with understated, sinister overtones, innovative pictorial nuance and montage, brilliant use of parallel editing of simultaneous action, menacingly oblique camera angles and revealing cross-cutting of objective shots with subjective views of a scene from an actor's perspective.

Hitchcock of relying on slick tricks, illogical story lines and wild coincidences, but he usually did not allow viewers time to ponder implausibilities because of the whiplike speed of his films.

Spinning his sophisticated yarns to create maximum tension, Mr. Hitchcock was not concerned with plausibility, which he regarded as no more important than the "MacGuffin," the term he used for the device about which his suspense revolved, whether it be the secret or documents or whatever the villains were seeking or trying to protect.

A favorite Hitchcock theme centered on "the wrong man" who was unjustly accused of a crime and hunted by both the villains and the police because of mistaken identity or incriminating information he inadvertently acquired.

The storyteller sought consistently to freshen the concept with novel variations and plot twists and to avoid cliches in a careerlong effort to refine his style and enrich his films.

His films were spiced with unusual peripheral characters and often shot on location in exotic settings. His heroines were usually "cool" classic beauties who "don't drip sex," he said.

At its best, the Hitchcock touch revealed a cornucopia of conjurer's tricks, dextrously juxtaposing tension and relaxation, relieving horror with humor.

He deplored James Bond-type gimmicks and played on childhood anxieties--fear of heights, enclosed places and open spaces--and his plots dealt with suspicion, guilt, complicity, delusion, vulnerability, irrationality, violence and sexual obsession.

He manipulated moviegoers so adroitly that at times they felt implicated in the most despicable acts, including those of a homicidal maniac. Hitchcock's world, people may or may not be what they appear to be, but the audience sees and knows more than the protagonists.

He invariably alerted viewers to imminent dangers such as a ticking time bomb, withholding the knowledge from imperiled characters, and identified the villains early on, eschewing the "whodunit" as "a sort of intellectual puzzle" that is void of emotion.

The director was intrigued by technical challenges, in making things work. He had a profound knowledge of all aspects of moviemaking, and wrote the production section for the Encyclopedia Britannica.

He made expert use of objects, placing, for example, a light in a glass of possibly poisoned milk in "Suspicion" to rivet attention on it. Before filming, he drew precise sketches of every scene, meticulously listing each camera angle.

Working with his screenwriter for months, he freely adapted material, writing up to page shot schedules without dialogue. He almost never looked through the camera's viewfinder and scrupulously avoided improvising on the set.

His films had such consistent mass appeal that reviewers were sometimes condescending to them. But in the '50s, a group of young French film makers and critics associated with Cahiers du Cinema newly extolled his achievements.

Francois Truffaut, a leading director of France's New Wave, praised him as "the most complete film maker" of all American directors and "an all-round specialist, who excels at every image, each shot and every scene.

Hitchcock as a leading "artist of anxiety" with a "purely visual" style, Mr. Truffaut commented that "Hitchcock is almost unique in being able to film directly, that is, without resorting to explanatory dialogue, such intimate emotions as suspicion, jealousy, desire and envy.

Detractors acknowledged his technical expertise in entertaining, but faulted his films for lacking substance and significance, for moral opportunism and for being cynical, superficial and glib in their views of human nature.

Admirers vehemently disagreed, terming him a compulsive storyteller who showed human nature as it is and not as it should be, and describing the psychological probing of much of his later work as profound in its foresight of an irrational and disordered world.

Resembling a pixieish gargoyle, the rotund director had a pudgy, basset-hound face with heavy jowls and pouting lips. He was a witty raconteur who gave sly, sardonic and eminently quotable interviews peppered with put-ons and whimsical ideas for new movies.

He became somewhat of a national institution in shaping a public image as a genially ghoulish cynic noted for barbed pronouncements about life and commercials in two popular weekly television series, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" and the "Alfred Hitchcock Hour," which he supervised and was host of in the late 50's and early 60's.

Behind his somewhat fictional self-projected image was a highly skilled and dedicated artist who withstood exhaustive study by debunkers.

Regarded as one of the shrewdest businessmen in Hollywood, he became a multimillionaire. He also gained more complete control over every aspect of his productions, screenplay, casting, photography, editing, soundtrack and publicity, than any Hollywood director.

Hitchcock, who also produced many of his later films, was showered with laurels. He won the Irving G. He was nominated for directorial Oscars five times, for "Rebecca," "Lifeboat," in , "Spellbound" in , "Rear Window" in and "Psycho" in Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born in London on Aug.

He graduated from St. Ignatius College, a Jesuit school in London, where he studied engineering, and took art courses at the University of London.

In childhood incidents, he developed a lifelong fear of the police and punishment, major influences on his movies. At about the age of 5, he was sent by his father with a note to a local police chief, who locked him in a cell for five minutes.

The second Evil Dead project is a 1: It's taken a month so far, and will probably take one more before it's done. Expect that to be added to the site in the near future.

To site updates, one new entry has been added into the Fan Collections page ; the huge collection of Peter Eherer from Germany.

Thanks to him for taking the time to do this, and allowing his collections to be added. A few updates have been made to the The Rarest Collectables page within the Collectables section.

Huge thanks for Daniel Culligan's assistance in getting this. Tom still sells copies of both at conventions. The finished item is truly astounding, and well worth it's own BookOfTheDead.

This is not quite the case. The farmhouse was actually owned by friends of the Tapert family. They apparently still get periodical checks to this day for allowing the filming there.

A new page; The Rarest Collectables page has been added. This page details a number of exceptionally rare items that serious Evil Dead collectors might want to track down for their collections.

It does not cover more general collectables such as DVDs, Blu-Rays, soundtracks, books, toys, fanmade items and such, or completely one-off, screen used or custom made items.

Just items which would have been numerous enough at the time, and might pop up on eBay every few years you might want to watch out for. Huge thanks to both for taking the time to do this, and allowing their collections to be added.

Two updated photos have been added towards the bottom of the Webmaster's Collection page ; photos which show an overview of my personal Evil Dead display corner, both in daylight, and lit up at night.

Lastly, you might spot some little formatting tweaks here across the site, depending on the browser you use. This site was always designed for display through Firefox, but that has increasingly lead to some little formatting quirks when it was viewed through other browsers.

Unhelpfully, every browser displays things very slightly differently. With this site, it's nothing major, just spacing differences mainly.

That's with the exception of the music player plug-in, used on some of the Score pages. The JWPlayer plug-in used, has since become a paid product, so upgrading it and restoring functionality is a costly prospect.

To keep it simple, the existing player has been left as it is, and a little zipped MP3 download link has been added underneath each player section for those who can't listen to the audio, on the following pages; Super-8 Origins - Scores page , Within The Woods - Score page , The Evil Dead - Score page , and the Evil Dead II Score page.

Four new Japanese item scans have been added to the site. Not to be confused with Greg's footage, this behind the scenes camcorder raw footage seems to be taken from tapes shot by Vern Hyde and his effects crew, which leans towards more general on set footage, rather than special effects.

All the related weblinks in the links section have been checked, the fair number of broken ones removed, and a few new ones added in. Lastly, some updates to Super8Shorts.

The text at the bottom of the site has been edited to reflect that while the site will remain online permanently, it's unlikely that any further shorts will be released there in the immediate short term.

That may hopefully change down the line, but for the moment, it will stop at the two DVD sets currently available.

Releasing further shorts is down to the remaining members of the group. Still, that's more than half the shorts now available on legal retail DVDs.

The 2 nd Edition features all NEW interviews from industry professionals such as: A newly updated companion website that features: Draven supplies information ranging from camera selection to the use of CGI in smaller productions.

Many previous instructional film books provide a lot of information in a dry manner that read like textbooks but Draven wisely embraces technology and offers a companion website to the book that allows specific examples of production forms andcontracts.

The site also presents candid interviews and behind the scenes footage and trailers for several titles in Draven's filmography.

An access code provided within the book is required to view the exclusive content and is well worth checking out. The Filmmaker's Book of the Dead is filled with tons of valuable information that will not only apply to horror fans, but to filmmakers across all genres working on a smaller budget.

In fact, there's a ton of great information packed inside making it a great go-to reference for anyone involved with indie production, not just horror.

If you want to learn how to make a horror movie without enrolling in film school, this book is where your journey should start!

Bookwalter…followers of cult cinema will be thrilled to hear these masters of low-budget features discuss the hazards of the industry.

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From the history of horror and the technique of the scare to pre-production and distribution, this complete, full-color guide to filmmaking uncovers all the insider secrets for creating your own spine-tingling horror film from start to finish.

The 2 nd Edition features all NEW interviews from industry professionals such as: A newly updated companion website that features: Draven supplies information ranging from camera selection to the use of CGI in smaller productions.

Many previous instructional film books provide a lot of information in a dry manner that read like textbooks but Draven wisely embraces technology and offers a companion website to the book that allows specific examples of production forms andcontracts.

The site also presents candid interviews and behind the scenes footage and trailers for several titles in Draven's filmography.

An access code provided within the book is required to view the exclusive content and is well worth checking out.

The Filmmaker's Book of the Dead is filled with tons of valuable information that will not only apply to horror fans, but to filmmakers across all genres working on a smaller budget.

In fact, there's a ton of great information packed inside making it a great go-to reference for anyone involved with indie production, not just horror.

If you want to learn how to make a horror movie without enrolling in film school, this book is where your journey should start!

Bookwalter…followers of cult cinema will be thrilled to hear these masters of low-budget features discuss the hazards of the industry.

The result is a fine history of horror and pre-production techniques key to putting on a superior production. There are also several insightful interviews throughout the book where horror icons such as Stuart Gordon, Robert Englund, and Tom Savini, dispense advice to aspiring filmmakers.

The book is beautifully laid out and is full of great images. There is also a companion website to the book where you can download examples of forms used in filmmaking and watch multimedia examples of topics discussed in the book.

This was at 4: Inspector Edward Walker of the Los Angeles police was asked if he regarded such a delay in calling the police as unusual.

He said he did not think so. Two radio patrolmen and a sergeant were the first policemen to arrive in the tree-lined neighborhood.

Shortly afterward the case was taken over by Detective Sgt. Sergeant Byron said Miss Monroe's bedroom was neat, but sparsely furnished.

He estimated it at fifteen feet square. And the telephone that she pulled on the bed. After the police had completed their investigation, Miss Monroe's body was removed to the Westwood Village Mortuary.

The house was sealed and placed under guard. The body was later taken to the county morgue for the autopsy, which was performed by Dr. Tsunetomi Noguchi, a pathologist.

In the last two years Miss Monroe had become the subject of considerable controversy in Hollywood. Some persons gibed at her aspirations as a serious actress.

They considered it ridiculous that she should have gone to New York to study under Lee Strasberg.

Miss Monroe's defenders, however, asserted that her talents had been underestimated by those who thought her appeal to moviegoers audience was solely sexual.

The disagreement about Miss Monroe took another form. One group contended she was typical of stars who had abused their privileges on sets.

An opposite group argued that Miss Monroe was an outstanding example of how Hollywood wanted to treat talent as just another commodity.

Levathes, executive vice president of Fox, said the suit would not be pressed against her estate. Hardly any of her neighbors had seen her more than once or twice in the six months since she had moved into her two-bedroom bungalow, which is modest by Hollywood standards.

Greenville, Ohio—Annie Oakley, champion markswoman, who in private life was Mrs. Frank Butler, died at the home of a relative here last night.

She had been in ill health for some time. Injuries received in a train accident in resulted in one side of her body being almost completely paralyzed.

Some of her best records for straight and fancy shooting, however, were made after she recovered. Her husband, who was her manager, has been seriously ill in Detroit for several days.

He is the only survivor. The funeral services Saturday will be private. AP Annie Oakley was born in a log cabin in Ohio 66 years ago.

Her father died when she was four years old and she soon helped out her mother by bringing in rabbits and other game that fell to her shotgun. At nine she was shooting so much game that she sent what the family did not need to town by stagecoach.

For the rest of her life she supported herself with her keen eye and steady hand. She was almost 16 years old when she met Frank Butler in her first public shooting match.

Her husband lost the match and fell desperately in love with his conqueror. They were soon married andmnearly 50 years later Mrs. Our outfit was more like a clan than a show or a business.

Even with all the. Touring Europe with the Buffalo Bill show, Annie Oakley met many crowned heads and one head that later wore a crown she came within four inches of hitting with a bullet.

It was the head of William Hohenzollern. The Crown Prince stepped forward, cigarette in mouth, and asked to have the trick performed on him.

Manager Butler was none too pleased at the prospect, but his wife coolly took aim and removed the ashes in the manner desired by the Prince, who later became Kaiser Wilhelm II.

One of the picturesque friends she made was Sitting Bull, the Indian chief. Annie Oakley will be buried in the hills of Darke County, Ohio, where she learned to handle a gun.

Last year she arranged for a final resting place at Woodland. To many million of American Negroes, the Rev.

Martin Luther King Jr. He was their voice of anguish, their eloquence in humiliation, their battle cry for human dignity.

He forged for them the weapons of nonviolence that withstood and blunted the ferocity of segregation. And to many millions of American whites, he was one of a group of Negroes who preserved the bridge of communication between races when racial warfare threatened the United States in the nineteen-sixties, as Negroes sought the full emancipation pledged to them a century before by Abraham Lincoln.

To the world Dr. King had the stature that accrued to a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, a man with access to the White House and the Vatican; a veritable hero in the African states that were just emerging from colonialism.

In his dedication to non-violence, Dr. King was caught between white and Negro extremists as racial tensions erupted into arson, gunfire and looting in many of the nation's cities during the summer of Militant Negroes, with the cry of, "burn, baby burn," argued that only by violence and segregation could the Negro attain self-respect, dignity and real equality in the United States.

McKissick, when director of the Congress of Racial Equality, declared in August of that year that it was a "foolish assumption to try to sell nonviolence to the ghettos.

And white extremists, not bothering to make distinctions between degrees of Negro militancy, looked upon Dr.

King as one of their chief enemies. At times in recent months, efforts by Dr. King to utilize nonviolent methods exploded into violence.

Last week, when he led a protest march through downtown Memphis, Tenn. Two days later, however, Dr. King said he would stage another demonstration and attributed the violence to his own "miscalculation.

At the time he was assassinated in Memphis, Dr. King was involved in one of his greatest plans to dramatize the plight of the poor and stir Congress to help Negroes.

He called this venture the "Poor People's Campaign. In one of his last public announcements before the shooting, Dr. King told an audience in a Harlem church on March Nonviolence is our most potent weapon.

His strong beliefs in civil rights and nonviolence made him one of the leading opponents of American participation in the war in Vietnam. To him the war was unjust, diverting vast sums away from programs to alleviate the condition of the Negro poor in this country.

He called the conflict "one of history's most cruel and senseless wars. Inevitably, as a symbol of integration, he became the object of unrelenting attacks and vilification.

His home was bombed. He was spat upon and mocked. He was struck and kicked. He was stabbed, almost fatally, by a deranged Negro woman. He was frequently thrown into jail.

Threats became so commonplace that his wife could ignore burning crosses on the lawn and ominous phone calls. Through it all he adhered to the creed of passive disobedience that infuriated segregationists.

The adulation that was heaped upon him eventually irritated some Negroes in the civil rights movement who worked hard, but in relative obscurity.

They pointed out--and Dr. King admitted--that he was a poor administrator. Sometimes, with sarcasm, they referred to him, privately, as "De Lawd.

King's successes were built on the labors of may who had gone before him, the noncoms and privates of the civil rights army who fought without benefit of headlines and television cameras.

The Negro extremists he criticized were contemptuous of Dr. They dismissed his passion for nonviolence as another form of servility to white people.

They called him an "Uncle Tom," and charged that he was hindering the Negro struggle for equality. King's belief in nonviolence was subjected to intense pressure in , when some Negro groups adopted the slogan "black power" in the aftermath of civil rights marches into Mississippi and race riots in Northern cities.

He rejected the idea, saying:. The white man needs the Negro to free him from his guilt. A doctrine of black supremacy is as evil as a doctrine of white supremacy.

The doctrine of "black power" threatened to split the Negro civil rights movement and antagonize white liberals who had been supporting Negro causes, and Dr.

King suggested "militant nonviolence" as a formula for progress with peace. At the root of his civil rights convictions was an even more profound faith in the basic goodness of man and the great potential of American democracy.

These beliefs gave to his speeches a fervor that could not be stilled by criticism. Scores of millions of Americans--white was well as Negro--who sat before television sets in the summer of to watch the awesome march of some , Negroes on Washington were deeply stirred when Dr.

King, in the shadow of the Lincoln Memorial, said:. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: And all over the world, men were moved as they read his words of Dec.

I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right, temporarily defeated, is stronger than evil triumphant.

For the poor and unlettered of his own race, Dr. There he embraced the rhythm and passion of the revivalist and evangelist. Some observers of Dr. King's technique said that others in the movement were more effective in this respect.

King had the touch, as he illustrated in a church in Albany, Ga. Put on your marching shoes; don'cha get weary; though the path ahead may be dark and dreary; we're walking for freedom, children.

Or there was the meeting in Gadsen, Ala. It went as follows:. Some of you have knives, and I ask you to put them up. Some of you have arms, and I ask you to put them up.

Get the weapon of non-violence, the breastplate of righteousness, the armor of truth, and just keep marching. It was said that so devoted was his vast following that even among illiterates he could, by calm discussion of Platonic dogma, evoke deep cries of "Amen.

King also had a way of reducing complex issues to terms that anyone could understand. Thus, in the summer of , when there was widespread discontent among Negroes about their struggle for equality of employment, he declared:.

The enormous impact of Dr. King's words was one of the reasons he was in the President's Room in the Capitol on Aug.

King's effectiveness was enhanced and given continuity by the fact that he had an organization behind him. Allied with it was another organization formed under Dr.

These two organizations reached the country, though their basic strength was in the South. They brought together Negro clergymen, businessmen, professional men and students.

They raised the money and planned the sit-ins, the campaigns for Negro vote registration, the demonstrations by which Negroes hacked away at segregationist resistance, lowering the barriers against Negroes in the political, economic and social life of the nation.

This minister, who became the most famous spokesman for Negro rights since Booker T. Washington, was not particularly impressive in appearance.

About 5 feet 8 inches tall, he had an oval face with almond-shaped eyes that looked almost dreamy when he was off the platform. His neck and shoulders where heavily muscled, but his hands were almost delicate.

There was little of the rabblerouser in his oratory. He was not prone to extravagant gestures or loud peroration. His baritone voice, though vibrant, was not that of a spellbinder.

Occasionally, after a particular telling sentence, he would tilt his head a bit and fall silent as though waiting for the echoes of his thought to spread through the hall, church or street.

In private gatherings, Dr. King lacked that laughing gregariousness that often makes for popularity. Some thought he was without a sense of humor.

He was not a gifted raconteur. King did have was an instinct for the right moment to make his moves. Some critics looked upon this as pure opportunism.

Nevertheless, it was this sense of timing that raised him in , from a newly arrived minister in Montgomery, Ala.

Negroes in that city had begun a boycott of buses to win the right to sit where they pleased instead of being forced to move to the rear of buses, in Southern tradition or to surrender seats to white people when a bus was crowded.

The day boycott by Negroes was already under way when the young pastor was placed in charge of the campaign. It has been said that one of the reasons he got the job was because he was so new in the area he had not antagonized any of the Negro factions.

Even while the boycott was under way, a board of directors handled the bulk of administrative work. However, it was Dr.

King who dramatized the boycott with his decision to make it the testing ground, before the eyes of the nation, of his belief in the civil disobedience teachings of Thoreau and Gandhi.

When he was arrested during the Montgomery boycott, he said:. We must use the weapon of love. We must have compassion and understanding for those who hate us.

We must realize so many people are taught to hate us that they are not totally responsible for their hate. But we stand in life at midnight; we are always on the threshold of a new dawn.

Even more dramatic, in some ways, was his reaction to the bombing of his home during the boycott. He was away at the time and rushed back fearful for his wife and children.

They were not injured. But when he reached the modest house, more than a thousand Negroes had already gathered and were in an ugly mood, seeking revenge against the white people.

The police were jittery. King pacified the crowd and there was no trouble. King was even more impressive during the "big push" in Birmingham, which began in April, With the minister at the limelight, Negroes there began a campaign of sit-ins at lunch counters, picketing and protest marches.

Hundreds of children, used in the campaign, were jailed. The entire world was stirred when the police turned dogs on the demonstrators. King was jailed for five days.

While he was in prison he issued a 9,word letter that created considerable controversy among white people, alienating some sympathizers who thought Dr.

King was being too aggressive. Some critics of Dr. King said that one reason for this letter was to answer Negro intellectuals, such as the wrier James Baldwin, who were impatient with Dr.

King's belief in brotherhood. Whatever the reasons, the role of Dr. King in Birmingham added to his stature and showed that his enormous following was deeply devoted to him.

He demonstrated this in a threatening situation in Albany, Ga. King said at the funeral:. We must not lose faith in our white brothers. King's words grew more potent and he was invited to the White House by President Kennedy and Johnson, some critics--Negroes as well as white--noted that sometimes, despite all the publicity he attracted, he left campaigns unfinished or else failed to attain his goals.

King was aware of this. But he pointed out, in , in St Augustine, Fla. It tends to generate courage in Negroes outside the movement.

It brings intangible results outside the community where it is carried out. There is a hardening of attitudes in situations like this.

But other cities see and say: Some communities, like this one, had to bear the cross. There was no false modesty in Dr.

King's self appraisal of his role in the civil rights movement. It would be both immoral and a sign of ingratitude if I did not face my moral responsibility to do what I can in this struggle.

We will meet your physical force with soul force. We will not hate you, but we cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws. We will soon were you down by our capacity to suffer.

And in winning our freedom we will so appeal to your heart and conscience that we will win you in the process. The enormous influence of Dr.

King's voice in the turbulent racial conflict reached into New York in In the summer of that year racial rioting exploded in New York and in other Northern cities with large Negro populations.

There was widespread fear that the disorders, particularly in Harlem, might set of unprecedented racial violence.

At this point Dr. King became one of the major intermediaries in restoring order. He conferred with Mayor Robert F. Wagner and with Negro leaders.

A statement was issued, of which he was one of the signers, calling for "a broad curtailment if not total moratorium on mass demonstrations until after Presidential elections.

The following year, Dr. King was once more in the headlines and on television--this time leading a drive for Negro voter registration in Selma, Ala.

Negroes were arrested by the hundreds. King was punched and kicked by a white man when, during this period of protest, he became the first Negro to register at a century-old hotel in Selma.

As a child his name was Michael Luther King and so was his father's. His father changed both their names legally to Martin Luther King in honor of the Protestant reformer.

Auburn Avenue is one of the nation's most widely known Negro sections. Many successful Negro business or professional men have lived there.

Martin Luther King Sr. Young Martin went to Atlanta's Morehouse College, a Negro institution whose students acquired what was sometimes called the "Morehouse swank.

Mays, took a special interest in Martin, who had decided, in his junior year, to be a clergyman. He was ordained a minister in his father's church in It was in this church he was to say, some years later:.

You've trampled over 19 million of your brethren. All men are created equal. America, rise up and come home.

King had his own church he pursued his studies in the integrated Crozier Theological Seminary, in Chester, Pa.

He was one of six Negroes in a student body of about a hundred. He became the first Negro class president. He was named the outstanding student and won a fellowship to study for a doctorate at the school of his choice.

The young man enrolled at Boston College in For his doctoral thesis he sought to resolve the differences between the Harvard theologian Paul Tillich and the neo-naturalist philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman.

During this period he took courses at Harvard, as well. While he was working on his doctorate he met Coretta Scott, a graduate of Antioch College, who was doing graduate work in music.

He married the singer in At that time few of Montgomery's white residents saw any reason for a major dispute with the city's 50, Negroes.

They did not seem to realize how deeply the Negroes resented segregated seating on buses, for instance. Rosa Parks, a Negro seamstress, refused to comply with a bus driver's order to give up her seat to a white passenger.

She was tired, she said. Her feet hurt from a day of shopping. Almost as spontaneous as Mrs. Parks's act was the rallying of many Negro leaders in the city to help her.

King and his family moved back to Atlanta, where he became a co-pastor, with his father, of the Ebenezer Baptist Church. As his fame increased, public interest in his beliefs led him to write books.

It was while he was autographing one of these books, "Stride Toward Freedom," in a Harlem department store that he was stabbed by a Negro woman.

It was in these books that he summarized, in detail, his beliefs as well as his career. Thus, in "Why We Can't Wait," he wrote:.

He has not organized for conquest or to gain spoils or to enslave those who have injured him. His goal is not to capture that which belongs to someone else.

He merely wants, and will have, what is honorably his. The possibility that he might someday be assassinated was considered by Dr. King on June 5, , when he reported, in St.

Death was due to peritonitis, which followed the first operation, that for appendicitis. The second operation was performed last Friday.

Like a newly discovered serum, used for the first time in Houdini's case, it was of no avail. The chapter of accidents which ended fatally for the man who so often had seemed to thousands to be cheating the very jaws of death began early in October at Albany, N.

On the opening night of his engagement at a theatre there a piece of apparatus used in his "water torture cell" trick was overturned and struck him on the foot.

Houdini called a physician from the audience, had his foot examined and then completed his performance. Afterward he went to a hospital and had the injured foot X-rayed.

A bone was found to be partly fractured and Houdini was advised to discontinue his tour a few days and give prompt attention and plenty of rest to the injured foot.

He declined to cancel his engagements, however, and did not miss a show. From Albany he and his company went to Schenectady. Houdini was suffering continuous pain and returned to Albany for several treatments.

By the time he left Schenectady for Montreal his whole system was in a weakened condition. During a reception following the address he commented on the strength of his stomach muscles and their ability to withstand hard blows without injury.

One of the students without warning or giving time for Houdini to prepare struck him twice immediately over his appendix.

He suffered no distress at the time but after he had boarded a train for Detroit he complained of pain. At first he attributed it to something he had eaten but as it increased he called in the company's nurse, who in turn arranged by wire to have a physician meet the magician in Detroit.

Leo Kretzka, a prominent physician, made a hurried examination and told the patient there were symptoms of appendicitis. He left it to Houdini to decide whether it would be advisable for him to appear that evening at the Garrick Theatre for the opening night of the show.

Houdini would not disappoint his admirers. Looking back on that last performance, the large audience now realizes that the famous magician did his tricks under a great strain.

He felt the grip of bonds he had never tested, the snap of a lock not forged by human hands. He was worried for one of the few times in his career and was plainly not up to his best form in some of his tricks.

At his hotel after the performance the pain increased. The house physician and the best Detroit could furnish were called.

Houdini was taken to Gray Hospital and the following afternoon underwent an operation for appendicitis. His removal from the hotel to the hospital was made at the suggestion of his family physician, William Stone of New York City, who had been notified by telephone of his friend's condition.

Until his death Houdini was conscious and his mind was keen and alert. The physicians who attended him say he was the best patient they ever had, and he helped them wonderfully.

His mental attitude, combined with his unusual stamina, did much to prolong his life. According to statements made by the physicians, the playful punches he received in Montreal were the direct cause of Houdini's death, for one of the blows caused the appendix to burst, saturating his system with poison.

Streptococcus peritonitis, which developed soon after the operation last Monday, seriously complicated the case.

This is a particularly virulent form of poisoning, and few cases are known to the medical profession where persons suffering from it have recovered.

Whatever the methods by which Harry Houdini deceived a large part of the world for nearly four decades, his career stamped him as one of the greatest showmen of modern times.

In his special field of entertainment he stood alone. With a few minor exceptions, he invented all his tricks and illusions, and in certain instances only his four intimate helpers knew the solution.

In one or two very important cases Houdini, himself, alone knew the whole secret. Houdini was born on March 24, His name originally was Eric Weiss and he was the son of a rabbi.

He did not take the name Harry Houdini until he had been a performer for many years. Legend has it that he opened his first lock when he wanted a piece of pie in the kitchen closet.

It is certain that when scarcely more than a baby he showed skill as an acrobat and contortionist, and both these talents helped his start in the show business and his later development as an "escape king.

At the age of 9 Houdini joined a traveling circus, touring Wisconsin as a contortionist and trapeze performer. The Davenport brothers were then famous, doing the first spiritualist work ever seen in this country.

They would ring bells while bound inside a cabinet and would agree to free themselves from any bonds. This inspired Houdini to a somewhat similar performance.

Standing in the middle of the ring, he would invite any one to tie him with ropes and would then free himself inside the cabinet.

In the ring at Coffeyville, Kan. Houdini, still only a boy, told him to go ahead. After a much longer stay in the cabinet than usual, the performer emerged, carrying the handcuffs in his free hands.

That was the beginning of his long series of escapes from every known sort of manacle. For years he called himself the Handcuff King, a title discarded as he extended and elevated the range of his performances.

From to he played all over the United States, in museums, music halls, circuses, and medicine shows, gradually improving his technique and giving up his purely contortionistic and acrobatic feats.

In he made his first visit abroad, and in London his sensational escapes from handcuffs at Scotland Yard won him a six months engagement at the Alhambra.

This was the first instance of his cleverly obtaining notoriety by a public or semi-public exhibition outside the theatre.

No other showman, unless it was Barnum, knew better how to arouse the curiosity and amazement of the public in this manner.

During a six-year tour of the Continent he escaped from dozens of famous prisons. In the Krupp plant at Essen he met the challenge of the workmen and freed himself from expertly constructed shackles before 70, persons.

He returned to America to find his fame greatly increased and a newly organized vaudeville ready to pay him many times his old salary.

He continued his prison escapes over here and in January, , broke from Cell 2 in the Federal prison at Washington, the cell in which Guiteau, President Garfield's assassin, had been confined.

In Houdini dropped the handcuff tricks for more dangerous and dramatic escapes, including one from an air-tight galvanized vessel, filled with water, locked in an iron- bound chest.

And he would free himself from the so-called torture cell, his own invention. In this he was suspended, head down, in a tank of water.

To thrill the general public he would hang from the roof of a skyscraper, bound in a strait-jacket, from which he would wriggle free to the applause of the crowd in the street below.

Thrown from a boat or bridge into a river, bound hand and foot and locked and nailed in a box, doomed to certain death by drowning or suffocation, he would emerge in a minute or so, a free man, swimming vigorously to safety.

In the last twenty years Houdini made many long tours, playing in nearly every important city in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. Occasionally others would attempt to imitate him, but his supremacy never was remotely threatened.

An evidence of the deep impression his work made on the public mind is the fact that the Standard Dictionary now contains a verb, "houdinize," meaning "to release or extricate oneself from confinement, bonds, or the like , as by wriggling out.

During the last few years Houdini had become internationally known as a tireless enemy and exposer of fraudulent mediums and all false claims in the field of spiritualism.

He was a member of The Scientific American committee that investigated Margery, the Boston medium, whom he denounced in vigorous language.

Most of it has been willed to the National Museum at Washington. He married in Wilhelmina Rahner of Brooklyn. He was a member of St.

Few men could relate more interesting anecdotes and experiences than Harry Houdini. He was fond of telling how he beguiled the late Theodore Roosevelt and the late Victor Herbert on a voyage to Europe aboard the Imperator.

Colonel Roosevelt had just returned from his exploration of the River of Doubt in Brazil. A number of other well-known men were present, all of them having intelligence of a high order.

Certainly it was not a credulous audience. I offered to summon the spirits and have them answer any questions that might be asked.

I had a slate with the usual covering and in a few moments brought forth a map, done in a dozen different colors of chalk, which indicated the spot where he had been on the famous River of Doubt.

That map was an exact duplicate of one that was to appear in his book which had not been published. I had never seen the map and, to make my case stronger, the name of W.

Stead, the English spiritualist and writer who lost his life on the Titanic, was signed below the map in a handwriting which one man present instantly recognized as that of Stead.

And I might add that I was unfamiliar with Stead's signature. The magician tried his hand at the medium business in his early days in Kansas and used to tell in this wise how he prepared for one of his first seances:.

When the time arrived for my act I puzzled the crowd by giving particulars of births and deaths in half of the families of the town.

Gradually I worked up to a climax, exclaiming:. What is this coming before me? Why, it is a man--a black man. He's lame--and his throat is cut from ear to ear.

Who is this man? For thirty-three years Houdini tried to solve the mysteries of spiritism. He told friends he was ready to believe, was anxious to believe, because he would find joy in proof that he could communicate with his father, mother and friends who had passed on.

He had agreed with friends and acquaintances, numbering hundreds, that the first to die was to try to communicate from the spirit world to the world of reality.

Fourteen of those friends had died, but none had ever given a sign, he said. Sargent, one of those who exposed Palladino in this city. Our relations were most intimate.

He died and I have not heard from him. Such an agreement I made with both my parents. They died and I have not heard from them. I thought once I saw my mother in a vision, but I now believe it was imagination.

We had worked together on the stage and had a private telegraphic code for signaling messages. We made a compact that the first who died should use that code to communicate with the other.

At his deathbed I held Berol's hand. He had been unconscious for some time. He showed no outward signs of a return to consciousness. His eyes remained closed.

But just as he passed away I could feel his hand making a faint pressure upon mine. That was repeated at intervals and I could recognize that the man who seemed unconscious and at death's door was talking to me in code.

I received and understood his message. But I hold it sacred and have never repeated it. Houdini counted that he had had "four close-ups with death" in his career of more than thirty years as a mystifier.

The closest was in California, where he risked his life on a bet and not as a public performance.

Seven years ago in Los Angeles he made a wager that he could free himself from a six-foot grave into which he was to be buried after being manacled.

He had first accustomed himself to the sensation of burial by more shallow interments. I had kept the sand loose about my body so that I could work dexterously.

But as I clawed and kneed the earth my strength began to fail. Then I made another mistake. Or, at least, I attempted to, and the last remnants of my self-possession left me.

Then instinct stepped in to the rescue. With my last reserve strength I fought through, more sand than air entering my nostrils.

The sunlight came like a blinding blessing, and my friends about the grave said that, chalky pale and wild-eyed as I was, I presented a perfect imitation of a dead man rising.

But Houdini did later permit himself to be "buried alive" in a hermetically sealed casket of zinc which was submerged in a pool at a New York hotel.

He remained there for more than an hour and a half, bettering the record of the Egyptian fakir, Rahmin Bey.

When there was talk of a "return" submergence contest between the magician and the fakir, Houdini made preparations to defend his title with all the care that he was wont to exercise in working up his baffling feats.

He began to cancel engagements that conflicted with a period of training he mapped out for himself. Houdini went "down" or submerged in his sealed casket for half an hour daily.

Friends of the showman said yesterday that he had developed a dislike for being called by his first name, Harry. He always wished to be called Houdini and disliked the prefix, Mr.

According to dispatches from Nice Miss Duncan was hurled in an extraordinary manner from an open automobile in which she was riding and instantly killed by the force of her fall to the stone pavement.

Affecting, as was her habit, an unusual costume, Miss Duncan was wearing an immense iridescent silk scarf wrapped about her neck and streaming in long folds, part of which was swathed about her body with part trailing behind.

As she took her seat in the car neither she nor the driver noticed that one of the loose ends fell outside over the side of the car and was caught in the rear wheel of the machine.

The automobile was going at full speed when the scarf of strong silk suddenly began winding around the wheel and with terrific force dragged Miss Duncan, around whom it was securely wrapped, bodily over the side of the car, precipitating her with violence against the cobblestone street.

She was dragged for several yards before the chauffeur halted, attracted by her cries in the street. Medical aid immediately was summoned, but it was stated that she had been strangled and killed instantly.

This end to a life full of many pathetic episodes was received as a great shock in France, where, despite her numerous eccentric traits, Miss Duncan was regarded as a great artist.

The car in which they had been left seated started, driverless, down a hill and plunged over a bridge into the Seine River.

During the war she acquired the further gratitude of the French by turning over her palatial home here for war relief headquarters.

She herself was reported to have made an attempt at suicide in the Mediterranean. Miss Duncan, reduced in her resources recently, succeeded through the aid of friends in completing plans for a school of aesthetics which she meant to start on the Riviera.

It was recently a current rumor among the friends of Miss Duncan that she would find happiness in a marriage with an American, which was to be celebrated at Nice Oct.

In connection with her fatal accident it is recalled that Miss Duncan for years affected an unusual dress cult and, with her brother, Raymond, often appeared in the streets of Paris and elsewhere garbed in a Roman toga with bare legs and sandals.

Roman purple in recent years was her preferred color and she often walked about Nice in flowing scarfs and robes. Alfred Hitchcock, whose mastery of suspense and of directing technique made him one of the most popular and celebrated of film makers, died yesterday at the age of 80 at his home in Los Angeles.

Hitchcock, ailing with arthritis and kidney failures, had been in declining health for a year. In a characteristically incisive remark, Mr.

Hitchcock once summed up his approach to moviemaking: His best movies were meticulously orchestrated nightmares of peril and pursuit relieved by unexpected comic ironies, absurdities and anomalies.

Films made by the portly, cherubic director invariably progressed from deceptively commonplace trifles of life to shattering revelations, and with elegant style and structure, he pervaded mundane events and scenes with a haunting mood of mounting anxiety.

In delicately balancing the commonplace and the bizarre, he was the most noted juggler of emotions in the longest major directorial career in film history.

His distinctive style was vigorously visual, always stressing imagery over dialogue and often using silence to increase apprehension. Among his most stunning montages were a harrowing attack by a bullet-firing crop-dusting plane on Cary Grant at a deserted crossroad amid barren cornfields in "North by Northwest," a brutal shower-slaying in "Psycho" and an avian assault on a sleepy village in "The Birds.

Hitch, as he was called by his friends and colleagues, doubtlessly frightened more audiences than any other director in movie history, and he was one of the few film makers who was a household name for many decades.

A trademark was the fleeting, nonspeaking appearances he made in his films. As the leading British director of the 30's, he set the standard for international intrigue and espionage with such classic thrillers as "The 39 Steps" and "The Lady Vanishes.

Reflecting his motif of a world in disorder, Mr. Hitchcock placed endangered protagonists in settings epitomizing order--citadels of civilization, the Statue of Liberty, United Nations headquarters, Mount Rushmore and Britain's Parliament.

Reviewers acclaimed his virtuosity in creating a rhythm of anticipation with understated, sinister overtones, innovative pictorial nuance and montage, brilliant use of parallel editing of simultaneous action, menacingly oblique camera angles and revealing cross-cutting of objective shots with subjective views of a scene from an actor's perspective.

Hitchcock of relying on slick tricks, illogical story lines and wild coincidences, but he usually did not allow viewers time to ponder implausibilities because of the whiplike speed of his films.

Spinning his sophisticated yarns to create maximum tension, Mr. Hitchcock was not concerned with plausibility, which he regarded as no more important than the "MacGuffin," the term he used for the device about which his suspense revolved, whether it be the secret or documents or whatever the villains were seeking or trying to protect.

A favorite Hitchcock theme centered on "the wrong man" who was unjustly accused of a crime and hunted by both the villains and the police because of mistaken identity or incriminating information he inadvertently acquired.

The storyteller sought consistently to freshen the concept with novel variations and plot twists and to avoid cliches in a careerlong effort to refine his style and enrich his films.

His films were spiced with unusual peripheral characters and often shot on location in exotic settings. His heroines were usually "cool" classic beauties who "don't drip sex," he said.

At its best, the Hitchcock touch revealed a cornucopia of conjurer's tricks, dextrously juxtaposing tension and relaxation, relieving horror with humor.

He deplored James Bond-type gimmicks and played on childhood anxieties--fear of heights, enclosed places and open spaces--and his plots dealt with suspicion, guilt, complicity, delusion, vulnerability, irrationality, violence and sexual obsession.

He manipulated moviegoers so adroitly that at times they felt implicated in the most despicable acts, including those of a homicidal maniac.

Hitchcock's world, people may or may not be what they appear to be, but the audience sees and knows more than the protagonists.

He invariably alerted viewers to imminent dangers such as a ticking time bomb, withholding the knowledge from imperiled characters, and identified the villains early on, eschewing the "whodunit" as "a sort of intellectual puzzle" that is void of emotion.

The director was intrigued by technical challenges, in making things work. He had a profound knowledge of all aspects of moviemaking, and wrote the production section for the Encyclopedia Britannica.

He made expert use of objects, placing, for example, a light in a glass of possibly poisoned milk in "Suspicion" to rivet attention on it.

Before filming, he drew precise sketches of every scene, meticulously listing each camera angle. Working with his screenwriter for months, he freely adapted material, writing up to page shot schedules without dialogue.

He almost never looked through the camera's viewfinder and scrupulously avoided improvising on the set. His films had such consistent mass appeal that reviewers were sometimes condescending to them.

But in the '50s, a group of young French film makers and critics associated with Cahiers du Cinema newly extolled his achievements.

Francois Truffaut, a leading director of France's New Wave, praised him as "the most complete film maker" of all American directors and "an all-round specialist, who excels at every image, each shot and every scene.

Hitchcock as a leading "artist of anxiety" with a "purely visual" style, Mr. Truffaut commented that "Hitchcock is almost unique in being able to film directly, that is, without resorting to explanatory dialogue, such intimate emotions as suspicion, jealousy, desire and envy.

Detractors acknowledged his technical expertise in entertaining, but faulted his films for lacking substance and significance, for moral opportunism and for being cynical, superficial and glib in their views of human nature.

Admirers vehemently disagreed, terming him a compulsive storyteller who showed human nature as it is and not as it should be, and describing the psychological probing of much of his later work as profound in its foresight of an irrational and disordered world.

Resembling a pixieish gargoyle, the rotund director had a pudgy, basset-hound face with heavy jowls and pouting lips. He was a witty raconteur who gave sly, sardonic and eminently quotable interviews peppered with put-ons and whimsical ideas for new movies.

He became somewhat of a national institution in shaping a public image as a genially ghoulish cynic noted for barbed pronouncements about life and commercials in two popular weekly television series, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" and the "Alfred Hitchcock Hour," which he supervised and was host of in the late 50's and early 60's.

Behind his somewhat fictional self-projected image was a highly skilled and dedicated artist who withstood exhaustive study by debunkers.

Regarded as one of the shrewdest businessmen in Hollywood, he became a multimillionaire. He also gained more complete control over every aspect of his productions, screenplay, casting, photography, editing, soundtrack and publicity, than any Hollywood director.

Hitchcock, who also produced many of his later films, was showered with laurels. He won the Irving G. He was nominated for directorial Oscars five times, for "Rebecca," "Lifeboat," in , "Spellbound" in , "Rear Window" in and "Psycho" in Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was born in London on Aug.

He graduated from St. Ignatius College, a Jesuit school in London, where he studied engineering, and took art courses at the University of London.

In childhood incidents, he developed a lifelong fear of the police and punishment, major influences on his movies.

At about the age of 5, he was sent by his father with a note to a local police chief, who locked him in a cell for five minutes.

In releasing him, the officer said, "That's what we do to naughty boys. Hitchcock later said he could never forget "the sound and the solidity of that closing cell door and the bolt.

Hitchcock attributed his fear of punishment to ritual beatings of the hands with a hard rubber strop, administered for infractions at St.

Ignatius, that he recalled "was like going to the gallows. He worked briefly as a technical calculator for a cable company, but soon abandoned technology for art, becoming an advertising layout draftsman for a London department store.

In his teens, he was determined to break into film making, and by brashness and ability he won a job in writing and illustrating title cards for silent pictures.

He rose quickly, to script writer, art director and assistant director. Hitchcock had become a director, making a melodrama called "The Pleasure Garden" on a shoestring budget in Munich, West Germany.

He began shaping his genre with "The Lodger," about Jack the Ripper.

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